The Development of GPS Technology In Vehicles Tracking

Headline

In 1978, the experimental Block-I GPS satellite was launched into spaceand turned out to be a successful test. By the end of 1985, 10 more Block-I satellites were launched to further validate the concept.On Jan. 17, 1994, the final of the first 24 sa

In 1978, the experimental Block-I GPS satellite was launched into space and turned out to be a successful test. By the end of 1985, 10 more Block-I satellites were launched to further validate the concept. On Jan. 17, 1994, the final of the first 24 satellites was launched, and the GPS system was considered fully operational.

Early GPS technology was designed primarily for use by the military.The uses for the military were clear in the 1980s and 1990s, but public interest in GPS technology was minimal. In 1996, President Bill Clinton determined on a policy that made GPS technology available to the average individual, including fleet managers, who could see the benefit of using the technology to keep tabs on their vehicles.

In the 1990s, further modifications were made to GPS technology. These included policy and accessibility changes. In 2006, the last GPS satellite was launched.

In the early days of fleet tracking, in order to properly track a fleet, each vehicle had to be enabled with a costly GPS device. The company was required to pay a typically high monthly fee to use the satellite tracking system. While helpful, these early systems were difficult to implement, costly to use and sometimes inconvenient for drivers and fleet management alike. Thus it took several years for the concept to catch on. In the earliest days, only large, wealthy fleets took advantage of the technology.

The modern fleet tracking system provides the necessary data to fleet managers allowing them to run their operations more efficiently. Reports on driver behavior, vehicle performance and fuel use all make it easier for the fleet manager to cut costs and increase efficiencies. These systems go beyond simple reporting of each vehicle location, offering fleet managers a wealth of information about their vehicles and their drivers.

Today, GPS tracking is increasingly efficient, able to provide data in real time and able to be used on mobile devices for tracking on the go. Fleet management professionals can have as little or as much tracking data as they want at their fingertips, making it a viable option for small fleets as well as large corporations.

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